Book Review – The Mockingbird by Kathryn Erskine

This will be a relatively short review, because I am not having the greatest week. My endometriosis is flaring up a bit, and on Wednesday I had an adverse reaction to my monthly allergy shots. Which had me in bed (and almost in the hospital) for 24 hours. I was up and about yesterday, but my body still felt worn out and was recovering from the onslaught of allergies and asthma. Today is much better.

Fun times for the first day of my daughter’s winter break. The last day of 2016 can not come soon enough!! It has been one thing after another this year, for me and the world.

On to the book review!

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Book: Mockingbird
Author: Kathryn Erskine
Publisher: Philomel Books
Genre: Middle Grade, Neurodiversity

Book Blurb: 

In Caitlin’s world, everything is black or white. Things are good or bad. Anything in between is confusing. That’s the stuff Caitlin’s older brother, Devon, has always explained. But now Devon’s dead and Dad is no help at all. Caitlin wants to get over it, but as an eleven-year-old girl with Asperger’s, she doesn’t know how. When she reads the definition of closure, she realizes that is what she needs. In her search for it, Caitlin discovers that not everything is black and white—the world is full of colors—messy and beautiful.Kathryn Erskine has written a must-read gem, one of the most moving novels of the year.

There aren’t too many books out there about girls with Asperger’s. Much of mainstream society’s understanding of Asperger’s (when they are even aware of what it is), is based on the profile of boy’s and men who are Aspies. In my life, I do know a few people with Asperger’s, all who identify as male. Is Asperger’s truly more prevalent amongst the male population, or is it woefully under-identified in the female populace? I would hazard a guess that it is a bit of both. Current research is beginning to show that the current diagnostic methods used for the autism spectrum overlook how it can manifest differently in girls.

On that note, enter Caitlin. An 11-year-old girl going through a very rough time in her life. She recently lost her brother in a school shooting, her mom died of cancer a few years previously, and her dad is struggling to come to terms with grief himself. Caitlin is struggling with her own grief and emotions, as well as fitting in at school and working on making new friends.

Looking at reviews written by people with Asperger’s, Kathryn Erskine has done a commendable job portraying what it is like for a young girl with Asperger’s. She tackles a difficult subject: how people deal with the loss of a loved one differently, and how our lives would be different – and better – if we work harder at understanding each other.

I loved the first person narration, seeing the world through Caitlin’s eyes. To experience how a typical school day feels for her .

“I hate recess even though Devon says it’s supposed to be my favorite subject and there is no recess once you get to middle school so enjoy it now. But I can’t enjoy it because I’m surrounded by sharp screaming and it’s too bright adn people’s elbows are all pointy and dangerous and it’s hard to breathe and my stomach always feels really really sick.”

There are quite a few times in the story where the other kids are really anger-inducing. As an adult looking in on the story, I wanted to scream out to the teachers, “Your school really needs some grade-wide lessons on anti-bullying, tolerance, and diversity!!!” The way that some of the other girls mocked Caitlin was frustrating, and I was happy to see this semi-addressed later on in the story.

I loved the tie-in with To Kill A Mockingbird. I won’t go into detail, but it really highlighted the sweet relationship between Caitlin and her brother. It was also completely cry-inducing. There were so many parts of this book that pulled on my heartstrings!

“When Dad drives me home from school I look at the sign in front of the church we used to go to. It says, OUR HEARTS are still with the families of Julianne, Devon and Roberta. Except OUR HEARTS couldn’t do anything to save Devon’s Heart. Maybe that’s why Dad drives past.”

Rating: 4/5 stars

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2 thoughts on “Book Review – The Mockingbird by Kathryn Erskine

  1. Oh no! I hope you feel better ASAP. Being ill over the holidays is the worst.
    This book sounds fascinating. I have noticed that women seem to be under represented as diagnosed with Aspergers. That’s a really fascinating observation that the way we diagnose it limits how often women are diagnosed. I must learn more!
    The tie in to TKAM really intrigues me. It honestly makes me more interested to read this, as I love TKAM. I haven’t heard of this book before, thank you for introducing me!

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